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NE1 - Landscape

Comment

On Behalf Of Conservancy Office, South East England Sent: Fareham Borough Council Draft Local Plan Consultation Local Plans and ancient woodland – Forestry Commission approach The Forestry Commission is not in a position to input into the consultation process for Local Plans. However, the information below is provided to assist you in assessing the appropriateness of sites for future development, and to highlight opportunities for achieving your renewable energy obligations. A summary of Government policy on ancient woodland Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act 2006 (published October 2006). Section 40 – "Every public authority must, in exercising its functions, have regard, so far as is consistent with the proper exercise of those functions, to the purpose of conserving biodiversity". National Planning Policy Framework (published March 2012). Paragraph 118 – "planning permission should be refused for development resulting in the loss or deterioration of irreplaceable habitats, including ancient woodland and the loss of aged or veteran trees found outside ancient woodland, unless the need for, and benefits of, the development in that location clearly outweigh the loss". National Planning Practice Guidance – Natural Environment Guidance. (Published March 2014) This Guidance supports the implementation and interpretation of the National Planning Policy Framework. This section outlines the Forestry Commission's role as a non-statutory consultee on "development proposals that contain or are likely to affect Ancient Semi-Natural woodlands or Plantations on Ancient Woodlands Sites (PAWS) (as defined and recorded in Natural England's Ancient Woodland inventory), including proposals where any part of the development site is within 500 metres of an ancient semi-natural woodland or ancient replanted woodland, and where the development would involve erecting new buildings, or extending the footprint of existing buildings" It notes that ancient woodland is an irreplaceable habitat, and that, in planning decisions, Plantations on Ancient Woodland Sites (PAWS) should be treated equally in terms of the protection afforded to ancient woodland in the National Planning Policy Framework. It highlights the Ancient Woodland Inventory as a way to find out if a woodland is ancient. Standing Advice for Ancient Woodland and Veteran Trees. (Published April 2014) The Forestry Commission has prepared joint standing advice with Natural England on ancient woodland and veteran trees which we refer you to in the first instance. This advice is a material consideration for planning decisions across England. It explains the definition of ancient woodland, its importance, ways to identify it and the policies that relevant to it. It also provides advice on how to protect ancient woodland when dealing with planning applications that may affect ancient woodland. It also considers ancient wood-pasture and veteran trees. The Standing Advice website will provide you with links to Natural England's Ancient Woodland Inventory, assessment guides and other tools to assist you in assessing potential impacts. The assessment guides sets out a series of questions to help planners assess the impact of the proposed development on the ancient woodland. Case Decisions demonstrates how certain previous planning decisions have taken planning policy into account when considering the impact of proposed developments on ancient woodland. These documents can be found on our website. The UK Forestry Standard (3rd edition published November 2011). Page 24 "Areas of woodland are material considerations in the planning process and may be protected in local authority Area Plans. These plans pay particular attention to woods listed on the Ancient Woodland Inventory and areas identified as Sites of Local Nature Conservation Importance SLNCIs). Keepers of Time – A Statement of Policy for England's Ancient and Native Woodland (published June 2005). Page 10 "The existing area of ancient woodland should be maintained and there should be a net increase in the area of native woodland". Natural Environment White Paper "The Natural Choice" (published June 2011) Paragraph 2.53 - This has a "renewed commitment to conserving and restoring ancient woodlands". Paragraph 2.56 – "The Government is committed to providing appropriate protection to ancient woodlands and to more restoration of plantations on ancient woodland sites". Biodiversity 2020: a strategy for England's wildlife and ecosystem services (published August 2011). Paragraph 2.16 - Further commitments to protect ancient woodland and to continue restoration of Plantations on Ancient Woodland Sites (PAWS). Renewable & low carbon energy The resilience of existing and new woodland is a key theme of the Forestry Commission's work to Protect, Improve and Expand woodland in England we will continue to work with Forestry / Woodland owners, agents, contractors and other Stakeholders to highlight and identify, pests and diseases and to work in partnership to enable Woodlands and Forests are resilient to the impacts of Climate Change. Woodfuel and timber supplies continues to be an opportunity for local market growth whilst also enabling woodlands to be brought back into active management. Flood risk The planting of new riparian and floodplain woodland, can help to reduce diffuse pollution, protect river morphology, moderate stream temperature and aid flood risk management, as well as meet Biodiversity Action Plan targets for the restoration and expansion of wet woodland. The Forestry Commission is keen to work in partnership with Woodland / Forest Stakeholders to develop opportunities for woodland creation to deliver these objectives highlighted above. In the wider planning context the Forestry Commission encourages local authorities to consider the role of trees in delivering planning objectives as part of a wider integrated landscape approach. For instance through: • the inclusion of green infrastructure (including trees and woodland) in and around new development; and • the use of locally sourced wood in construction and as a sustainable, carbon lean fuel.

GU10


Object

"One if the reasons we have chosen to live in warsash is to enjoy its delightful natural environment. The sheer size of the proposed developments at Greenaway Lane will largely destroy this in the immediate confines of warsash and the so called ""green coridors"" shown on the plan are simply not enough to alleviate this."

PO13


Object

Portchester 's habitats are being destroyed for all this new housing, its dangerous! The green parts that are left are being destroyed! Porchester is already too busy on the roads and will be an added strain on police , schools and other services.

PO16


Object

I object to any development of land at Romsey Avenue and Winham Farms Fields. This is in regard to the detrimental affect on: 1) Transport Issues 2) Lack of green space 3) Lack of school, doctors facilities 4) Additional traffic 5) Impact on wildlife 6) Danger to vulnerable members of society (children/elderly) 7) Loss of Grade 1 agricultural 8) Detrimental effect on vast majority of Portchester residents

PO16


Object

The 4 sites allocated in Porchester are on green sites. At present, for example Porchester East only as a National Green space surplus of 85% & Salisbury has a 86.9% surplus. The Allocation of sites with the draft local plan does not share the building housing access the borough equally. Sites put forward by land owners more scattered across the borough. If the { not known} of houses needed more spread equally across the 15 wards in the borough, each ward would take about 15 new houses. The allocation given to Portchester in the plan is over 70 houses.

PO16


Object

There is not enough space and the local roads too crowded and the additional traffic this plan will bring. This is also going to cause extra congestion near the school. I am not aware of any traffic calming measures to provide child safety. The impact of the additional traffic and population in Portchester will markedly alter the feel and dynamic of the area. I am not aware of any additional policing, traffic calming, school or health care support for the influx of people. I am also objecting as I am concerned about emergency service access on the congested roads near the proposed development. Open land is also important to the well being of the area, providing recreation areas, wildlife habitat and natural tracks, I object to this being removed.

PO16


Object

Concerns me that FBC have decided or are considering developing on a site that thev Solent Wader report clearly shows the site as "important" and they may clearly decide to ignore this! There have been migrating birds & waders on this site for the past 20 years!! The farmer has been clearly ploughing the field late to discourage the birds coming to this site in the winter. The access road for the proposed site is a complete joke! With a path either side is there really enough room for 2 way traffic?!? One road in & one road out has to be a hazard ?! Beauliey Avenue has cars parked along one side 24/7 and access down this road a school drop off time is hideous! I have personally been stuck at the top of the road for over 20 minutes……. with Cranleigh & potentially Romsey Ave being developed the road infrastructure will not support the extra traffic. The A27 at rush hour when the motorway is congested or shut due to a accident already grinds to a halt, what measures are you putting into place? I suspect nothing!!! Even considering Romsey Ave as a "suitable site" for development is a complete contradiction

PO16


Object

This field is close to the shore at Wicor, it is therefore very important as it supports wild life which also need water such as wild foul, geese and other birds. The council needs to re-visits its coastal policy which has been removed recently from the council plan. Romsay Ave used to be part off a strategic gap, which kept the identity of Portchester. It should be revistated. The Council should send this plan for a re think.

PO16


Comment

The development of one Cornfield and present intensively farmed on Grade 1 and Grade 2 Agricultural Land will destroy farming and two adjoining fields, removing another 14 hectares of prime farmland. The Government does not want to lose these areas to housing developments.

PO16


Object

Natural Environment Policy NE1 – Development proposals must respect, enhance and not have severe adverse impacts on the character or function of the landscape that may be affected, with particular regard to: a) Intrinsic landscape, character, quality and important features; b) Visual setting, including to/from key views; c) The landscape as a setting for settlements; d) The landscape's role as part of the existing Green Infrastructure network; e) The local character and setting of buildings and settlements; f) Natural landscape features, such as trees, ancient woodland, hedgerows, water features and their function as ecological networks. The proposals HA15 and HA26 (and indeed HA17) will have sever adverse impacts on both the character and function of the existing landscape along Beacon Bottom and all clauses A-F would be compromised. In particular, the ecological networks under threat as per the report from the Hampshire Biodiversity Information Centre habitat survey of June 2011 must be revisited. In particular, High risk with regard to Protected and Notable Species and Habitat (Ancient tree felling would only be permitted under licence by Natural England. Development of land North of Beacon Bottom will have an impact on the ancient hedgerow and the wildlife it supports including (as reported by the RSPB) nationally declining species such as sparrows, starlings and song thrushes.

SO31


Support

Policy NE1 Landscape CPRE supports this policy

SO23


Support

Large Format Response - Ref0080

GU1


Comment

Large Format Response - Ref0052

PO12


Comment

Large Format Response - Ref0167 PDF (233 KB)

 



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